CUNY Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Access Conference 2023

The Illusion of Inclusion:
Collaborative Solutions for Performative Diversity

Thursday, March 30, 2023 - Friday, March 31, 2023

Friday, March 31 Workshop Sessions

Creating Student Equity Internship Experiences to Address Social and Racial Inequities

Track: Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel Discussion

The presenters supported by CUNY's Black Race and Ethnic Studies Initiative grant awards will share their approaches for creating student health internship experiences addressing racial health inequities impacting marginalized communities in New York City. Reducing racial health inequity is a broad goal that requires action at many levels, and many organizations are developing interventions to improve outcomes for patient populations and communities. The panelist will share the model(s) used by them to educate the students pursuing degrees in public health and health sciences on the impact of racial and ethnic inequities on the health of historically underrepresented communities. Through internship experiences focused on health disparities, students gain access to communities in New York City that reflect the challenges and health inequities across the nation. These experiences provide them with opportunities to promote racial health equity on one hand and on the other, prepare them for their career in the healthcare field.

Timothy Aubry
Professor
Baruch College
Punita Bhansali
Assistant Professor
Queensborough Community College
Robin A. A. Harper
Professor
York College
Lesley Rennis
Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Anuradha Srivastava
Associate Professor
Queensborough Community College

Antiracism in the Creative Writing Classroom: Toward a New Pedagogy

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies; Disability Inclusion

Panel/Workshop

There is much recent pedagogy on antiracism in the creative writing classroom (see: Mathew Salesses and Felicia Rose Chavez), upending the dominant University of Iowa paradigm which privileges reader and silences author. But this pedagogy primarily focuses on the predominantly white classroom. What does this mean for the CUNY undergraduate creative writing classroom? How might we adapt this pedagogy and how might students benefit? A Lehman creative writing professor, a recent Lehman BA, and a recent Lehman MA discuss their time in creative writing classrooms, and demonstrate a possible workshop model (attendees will be asked to participate in the mock workshop).

Allison Amend
Professor
Lehman College
Yennick Gonzalez
Student
Lehman College
Rafiana Martinez
Student
Lehman College

Antisemitisms, Past and Present: How They are Manifested at CUNY

Track: 

Panel

This panel places antisemitism in its historical and cultural context, explores its psychological roots, and discusses ways the offices of DEI can engage to support civility on campus. The first talk discusses the ways Jews have historically been used as a foil for that which society anathematizes, which adds context to viewing the actions of the Jewish state in a global perspective. Through a history of antisemitism, the presenter will describe a lens with which we may view criticisms of Israel. The second talk presents several studies which show a new theoretical model of antisemitism. The results suggest a new way to view the positionality of Jews in the global context. The last two talks will focus on the campus climate for students and faculty at CUNY, and upon actions by the PSC-CUNY. Finally, we will suggest how to improve the climate and combat antisemitism.

Ilya Bratman
Executive Director, Hillels at Baruch
Baruch College
David Brodsky
Assc Professor
Brooklyn College
Florette Cohen
Assc Professor
College of Staten Island
Jonathan Epstein
Adjunct Associate Professor
John Jay College

Bringing Linguistic Justice into DEI: Activism through Institutional Ethnography

Track: From Data to Action

Workshop

This workshop will consist of two parts. First, we will present an overview of our institutional ethnography exploring how language is lived on our campus, with a view toward creating more equitable language practices, particularly around the treatment of language in writing instruction. Second, using the methodology of our study as a framework, we will facilitate two consciousness-raising activities among participants to identify potential gaps and/or contradictions between how their own campuses talk about inclusivity when it comes to linguistic diversity and the actual practices that would promote equity for students no matter their language backgrounds. Through these activities, participants will identify areas for future intervention on their campus and/or across CUNY.

Tara Jean Coleman
Assc Professor
LaGuardia CC
Maria Jerskey
Professor
LaGuardia CC

Inclusive Language & Diversified Patient Populations & Settings:
A Contemporary Case Based Approach in Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Oriented Healthcare Education

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel Discussion or Short Presentation

This presentation will outline evidenced-based instructional and pedagogical strategies for DEI-centered healthcare education that facilitates students to critically reason out sensitive clinical situations involving social justice and holistic approaches to care. The model of this presentation is through the use of carefully constructed case-based approaches in supporting students' critical self-analysis and reflection as they develop into healthcare practitioners.

Donald Auriemma
Assc Professor
York College
Clover Hutchinson
Asst Professor
York College
Vikram Pagpatan
Assistant Lecturer of the Occupational Therapy Program
York College

Inside and Outside the Classroom: 50+ Years of Ethnic Studies at the Borough of Manhattan Community College

Track: From Data to Action; Designing Inclusive Pedagogies; Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Double Roundtable #1

Initially established as the Black Studies Program in 1970, the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies (DERS) at BMCC is uniquely situated at CUNY as the only department to explicitly include multiple areas in the field of Ethnic Studies. Over its 50year existence, DERS has led a number of initiatives at the college, university, and larger community level. In this double roundtable, a number of faculty from the department will continue the discussion on the importance of Ethnic Studies as essential in the college curriculum. They will reflect on the history of the department, and on their experiences teaching Ethnic Studies at BMCC. Presenters will examine strategies used both inside and outside of the traditional classroom and engage in conversation on the challenges and possibilities for the teaching Ethnic Studies at CUNY. Participants will also discuss the continued struggle to expand Ethnic Studies amid ongoing budget cuts to public institutions and conservative political backlash against “critical race theory” approaches. The main objective of these conversations is to evaluate our work so far, to engage other programs and initiatives at CUNY, and to continue to build strong curriculum and programs for our students.

Lissette Acosta Corniel
Asst Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
OLUREMI Alapo
adjunct
CUNY, Borough of Manhattan Community College [BMCC]
Eleanor Drabo
Former Director of the Center for Ethnic Studies at BMCC. Professor in Africana Studies, Emerita.
Borough of Manhattan Community College
DeRoy Gordon
Lecturer
Borough of Manhattan CC
Soniya Munshi
Interim Executive Director of AAARI; Associate Professor Ethnic and Race Studies
Borough of Manhattan Community College
RaShelle Peck
Asst Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Andrew P. Smallwood
Assc Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Linta Varghese
Assc Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC

Making Data Actionable: Equity-Minded Actions to Reduce Equity Gaps in Mathematics Pathways Success

Track: From Data to Action; Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Workshop

Equity and Inclusion are values that LaGuardia Community College and the City University of New York promote through mission statements and strategic planning. We present how to use performance metrics of math course sequences at LaGuardia Community College to quantify equity gaps in student success. We highlight how quantifying equity gaps in STEM can help practitioners better understand why pedagogy must be centered on race. Notably, we show how practicing traditional ways of teaching mathematics impacts Hispanic/Latinx and Black students. This research will also enable the development of actions at the classroom level to reduce equity gaps in mathematics achievement and continuously assess their impact in the short term to foster equitable classroom experiences for minoritized student populations

Milena Cuellar
Professor
LaGuardia CC
Reem A. Jaafar
Professor
LaGuardia CC

Quantitative Literacy and Social Justice as Tools for Inclusive Transformative Pedagogy

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Presentation

This presentation will illustrate the implementation of the assignment designed on principles of inclusive transformative pedagogy in the Social Psychology course at LaGuardia Community College, as students engaged in the semester-long class project focused on building quantitative literacy through survey research experience in the context of investigating issues of social justice. While the first part of the presentation focuses on describing the class project, the second part will focus on discussion of students’ and instructor’s experiences, including challenges of designing and implementing the project, as a process of creating inclusive transformative learning spaces and sites for identity development. This class project was designed as part of participation in the CUNY-wide, NSF funded research study Faculty Development and Student Engagement in Data Analysis (FDSEDA): Building Capacity in Numeracy among Underrepresented Students and its Data Analysis Research Experience (DARE) Program focusing on the infusing quantitative reasoning and data analysis in the curriculum.

Dusana Podlucka
Professor
LaGuardia CC

The Invisibility of Faculty and Staff of Color in Institutions of Higher Education:
An Earnest Discussion about Retention, Mentoring, and Survival in Academia

Track: Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel Discussion

There are unspoken structural barriers that impede faculty of color from experiencing an equitable workplace that supports their promotion and retention in higher ed. The service burden also known as “cultural taxation,” places pressure on faculty of color to serve as role models, mentors, even surrogate parents to students of color, and to fulfill the institutional need for ethnic/racial representation. This service burden has increased as student bodies become more diverse and college campuses increase their efforts to provide inclusive learning environments that increase student enrollment. It is important to note that while student bodies are more diverse the diversity among faculty is lagging. This panel discussion will present the lived experience of three faculty and one staff from various CUNY campuses and will provide faculty and staff of color sound guidance to thrive in academia.

Dr Damaris-Lois Y Lang
Professor
Hostos Community College
Jermaine L. Monk
Assistant Professor, Social Work
Lehman College
Allyson Regis
Adjunct Professor, Mental Health Counseling
Queens College (former)
Elys Vasquez-Iscan
Associate Professor
Hostos Community College

The Power of Music: Highlighting Music's Ability to Heal, Promote Access and Build Community

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies; Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel

This panel highlights the power of music in a variety of spaces.  The musician scholars will take the audience through a journey in their areas of expertise: education, well-being, and building community, showing the important and beautiful ways music touches our lives and influences systems.

Joseph Caravalho
Asst Professor
Hostos CC
Glenn McMillan
Professor
Medgar Evers College
Nicole Wallenbrock
Asst Professor
Hostos CC
Tom Zlabinger
Associate Professor
York College

Creating a Multilingual Campus and Classroom Ecology: Reflections and Strategies

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Presentation and Reflective Exercise

As we develop inclusive classrooms, do we value the languages and English registers that students arrive with? One thing is clear: Students who do not speak the privileged varieties of English face societal discrimination. To develop an equitable classroom and workplace, educators need to question language attitudes and myths more than ever. Luckily, there is a growing body of research to guide us. This presentation will outline a shift from a deficit-based to an asset-based view of language which treats students’ linguistic backgrounds as resources and provides a theoretical grounding for a language-aware pedagogy. Summarizing what we have learned as co-leaders of Language Across the Curriculum (LAC), which inspired LaGuardia Community College to include language diversity as part of its Inclusive Pedagogies, we will outline ways to engage students’ multilingual skills in achieving academic success and to promote language justice on campus.

Leigh Christine Garrison-Fletcher
Professor
LaGuardia CC
Lucy R. McNair
Professor
LaGuardia CC

Decolonizing Public Speaking Courses

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel

Our group of communication, linguistic, and adult education scholars from three CUNY campuses propose this panel to explore the question: What does a decolonized Public Speaking course look like? This panel will present the mid-point findings of a year-long project supported by a CUNY BRESI grant, including some of the problems we encountered in the field and in the traditional pedagogy used in the course. Traditional Public Speaking courses in the United States teach a narrow and ethnocentric view of what makes an effective speech. Little room is allowed for diverse cultural perspectives and little to no acknowledgement that different communities value different styles of public speech.Though our research is focused specifically on Public Speaking courses, the lessons we’ve learned are applicable to any course with a speech or presentation requirement.

Carlos F. de Cuba
Assc Professor
Kingsborough CC
Jaime Riccio
Asst Professor
LaGuardia CC
Joni Schwartz
Professor
LaGuardia CC
Cheyenne Seymour
Assc Professor
Bronx CC
Poppy Slocum
Assc Professor
LaGuardia CC
Patricia Sokolski
Assc Professor
LaGuardia CC

Decolonizing the Accounting Profession - The Accounting Program DEI Accelerator

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Workshop

The accounting profession recognizes its lack of talent from underrepresented groups as a critical issue, with the 2021 American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) Trend Report showing that 77% of CPAs are White, 5% are Hispanic or Latino, and 2% are Black. As DEI efforts in accounting continue to fall behind, the profession is looking to partner with colleges like LaGuardia, a Hispanic Serving Institution with a diverse student population. The Accounting Program DEI Accelerator at LaGuardia is a BRESI grant-funded three-phase model where faculty identify accounting majors from historically excluded racial and ethnic groups and provide guidance and coaching for scholarships, internships, and professional development opportunities. The Accelerator’s sustainable framework identifies participants, catalogs opportunities on and off-campus, and offers information sessions, workshops, and supports for participants to access opportunities. The Accelerator ultimately aims to change the common narrative about who is and isn’t supposed to be an accountant.

Andrea Francis
Professor
LaGuardia CC

Inside and Outside the Classroom: 50+ Years of Ethnic Studies at the Borough of Manhattan Community College

Track: From Data to Action; Designing Inclusive Pedagogies; Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Double Roundtable #2

Initially established as the Black Studies Program in 1970, the Department of Ethnic and Race Studies (DERS) at BMCC is uniquely situated at CUNY as the only department to explicitly include multiple areas in the field of Ethnic Studies. Over its 50year existence, DERS has led a number of initiatives at the college, university, and larger community level. In this double roundtable, a number of faculty from the department will continue the discussion on the importance of Ethnic Studies as essential in the college curriculum. They will reflect on the history of the department, and on their experiences teaching Ethnic Studies at BMCC. Presenters will examine strategies used both inside and outside of the traditional classroom and engage in conversation on the challenges and possibilities for the teaching Ethnic Studies at CUNY. Participants will also discuss the continued struggle to expand Ethnic Studies amid ongoing budget cuts to public institutions and conservative political backlash against “critical race theory” approaches. The main objective of these conversations is to evaluate our work so far, to engage other programs and initiatives at CUNY, and to continue to build strong curriculum and programs for our students.

Judith Anderson
Assc Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Alexander Ho
Instructor
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Michael Liu
Asst Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Patricia Mathews
Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Michael Partis
Adjunct Lecturer in Africana Studies
Borough of Manhattan Community College

Nursing Students Using Didactic to Prevent Black Pregnancy Related Deaths

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Oral presentation and Powerpoints

Background Maternal Mortality is defined as a pregnancy related death that occurs during pregnancy, during delivery and up 42 days following a delivery. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the United States has the highest Maternal Mortality when compared to ten other developed countries. Furthermore, Black women are almost 2-3 times more likely to die than from pregnancy related deaths than their white counterparts. The purpose of this project for nursing students to use an educational tool to teach pregnant women about warning signs that can occur during pregnancy and six weeks thereafter. Description Nursing students will learn didactic knowledge off high-risk pregnancy while empowering women to seek medical help for pregnancy related danger signs. This can lead to early recognition intervention and prevent adverse outcomes. The students will teach maternity patients material derived from the CDC’s Hear Her champaign. The goal includes students will be aware of the racial/ethnic disparities that exist in maternal care; students will be aware that there is unconscious bias in healthcare, students will understand the major causes of maternal mortality and they should be able to identify high-`risk pregnant women. Students will be providing healthcare education that include the “urgent maternal warning signs” provided by the CDC. Data to be derived from pre and post student survey.

Rodney Blair
Hostos Community College
Teresa Amanda Gray
Asst Professor
Hostos CC
Ronette Shaw
Hostos Community College

Responding to Racialized Trauma: Liberatory Practices to Move Through

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies; Physical & Mental Health Pre- & Post Quarantine: Our New Syndemic Normal

Interactive Workshop

When creating a dance performance piece based on QCC's 2022 Common Read selection, "Citizen: An American Lyric" by Claudia Rankine, I did not want the creative process to harm the students. Because the book dealt with systemic and interpersonal racism and its physiological toll on the body, I scaffolded the rehearsals to create a container of mutual trust and safety. This experiential workshop will replicate that rehearsal process. Using check-ins, reflective journal prompts, and needs assessments, we will dive into a charged topic and share our experiences and insights about racism. The tradition of white supremacy in higher education dance programs can also harm students, and most QCC dance majors aim to transfer into elite college dance programs that value Eurocentric dance forms over others. Three QCC Dance Faculty members approach dance pedagogy from an anti-racist lens to create an inclusive space for the whole student. In our workshop, we will discuss the evolution toward a culturally responsive pedagogy in three studio courses required for the dance major.

Emily Berry
Assc Professor
Queensborough CC
Aviva Geismar
Assc Professor
Queensborough CC
Nicole Y. McClam
Asst Professor
Queensborough CC

Teaching While Black and Male: Challenges and Rewards

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Presentation and Group Discussions

Teaching while Black means that it is useful for Black professors to understand how factors such as otherness and marginality that may be embraced by some students can impinge upon their pedagogical relationships with students. As such, the “double consciousness paradigm” as articulated by Du Bois (1903), can serve as professional grounding for Black professors in many domains of their academic careers. For example, it is important for Black instructors to be cognizant of what it means to teach content regarding race and oppression in the context of classrooms that are predominantly White. Correspondingly, teaching race-informed content when you are Black may induce racialized anxiety in these students, thus inhibiting them from contributing to classroom conversation. Moreover, Black professors engaged in classroom discussions where the majority of students are white could elicit stereotypical cultural and social perceptions similar to the ones held by society.

Samuel R. Aymer
Assc Professor
Hunter College

Thank You, #BRESIJumpstart: Reflections on Mentoring as a Site of Resistance & Healing

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel

In Fall 2022, we received CUNY Black, Race and Ethnic Studies Initiative (BRESI) funding to support the establishment of an immersive, interdisciplinary, intercollegiate community college mentored undergraduate student research program. Our project, Jumpstarting the Black and Latine/x Emerging Scholar Pipeline, trained 11 Bronx Community and LaGuardia Community College Students in anti-racist research methodologies and ethics. In this session, we use critical endarkened/Black storytelling (Toliver, 2022) to share critical moments/incidents within the research mentorship experience. We center milestones that impacted our professional development (as intersectional Black community college faculty scholars), epistemologies, teaching praxis, job satisfaction, sense of belonging in academe, and healing from systemic racism in higher education (Bertrand Jones et. al, 2020; Griffin, 2013). We invite other BIPOC faculty to share their endarkened stories toward exploring the possibilities of sustainable restorative/action-oriented mentoring programs that decenter individualism, competition, and whitestream achievement oriented practices within CUNY.

Justin T. Todd Brown, PhD, MPH
Professor
LaGuardia CC
Monique A. Guishard
Professor
Bronx CC

The Future is Here: Place-based Pedagogy and Engagement as Inclusive Practice

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Workshop/Panel Presentation

Inclusive pedagogical practices are student-centered but often bounded by on-campus experiences. This presentation will focus on two programs based at College of Staten Island (CSI). The first program will spotlight CSI St. George – an extension of CSI and the establishment of a grant-funded intentional learning community focused on “Public Interest Technology”(PIT). The second program will spotlight CSI’s recent designation as an HSI. College of Staten Island/CUNY (CSI) and La Colmena, a community-based organization created a mutually reinforcing partnership. The College and Career Pipeline for Immigrant Families is a supportive pathway to CSI’s continuing education and degree-bearing programs for La Colmena’s members; improving individual and family potential for economic vitality. We will discuss the role that “place” plays in transformative practices at CUNY. We want to know how critical practice in community engagement disrupts dominant narratives that often equate “social mobility” with deficit models, and academic success with assimilation.

Kathleen (Katie) M. Cumiskey
Professor
College of Staten Island
Crystal Montalvo
Continuing Education Dir
College of Staten Island

Data in DEI: A Panel on Using Data to Inform DEI Work and Decision Making on College Campuses

Track: From Data to Action; Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel

This panel will highlight the work of two groups utilizing data in DEI work.  The first group developed a DEI assessment and conducted a national study with the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, whose leadership helped facilitate focus groups with its member presidents and diversity officers. They learned that the instrument helped many institutions engage in important conversations about DEI, bringing to light issues of ethnic/racial, gender, religious, and LGBTQ+ inequities. The instrument helped guide areas to be addressed that were missing from their DEI plans and serve as a framework for ensuring DEI within the institutional climate. In this session, they will present our instrument, the results of the national study, and engage participants in discussions of how this system can be useful within their contexts.  The other group will present on the work being done at Queens College, who is implementing a new approach to decision-making that incorporates both data and community input to fully integrate diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) into campus culture and operations.

Anthony Brown
Executive Chief Diversity Officer and Special Assistant to the President
Brooklyn College
Tammie Lea Cumming
Assc Provost-AVP
Brooklyn College
Jerima DeWese
Exec Chf Diversity Off-AstAdm
Queens College
Lizandra Friedland
Instit Research Mgr
Queens College
M. David Miller
Professor, Research and Evaluation Methods; Director, School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education
University of Florida

A Tool to Assess Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in STEM: the STEM DEI Syllabi Rubric

Tracks: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Workshop

The lack of retention found among underrepresented minority STEM students that reflects on limited diversity of STEM graduating classes, is a challenge across the nation. One factor that can improve these outcomes is a shift from a traditional to a more inclusive pedagogy, which promotes the persistence of college students, promoting systemic change in the teaching of STEM disciplines by closing the gap between learners, educators and the content sources used in the classroom. The syllabus is a powerful pedagogical tool that can promote equity, diversity and inclusion in the STEM classroom, but assessing how our syllabi address these issues is not traditionally done in higher education. In this workshop we will share the content and implementation of a rubric designed to assess equity, diversity and inclusion practices within the syllabus. We will also discuss with participants how its implementation might improve their teaching and the engagement of STEM students.

Lissette Delgado-Cruzata
Assc Professor
John Jay College
Sergio Gallegos Ordorica
Asst Professor
John Jay College
Dyncie Valdez
John Jay College

In Plain Sight: Trials and Triumphs of Building Black Studies Departments at CUNY

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel

It is often said when America catches a cold the Black community catches the flu. The COVID-1p pandemic sent this adage into overdrive for students and Black Studies chairpersons, alike. Historical issues of Black student access and resource deprovation were both multiplied and magnified during the pandemic. The ongoing struggle of chairpersons and directors of Black Studies programs to staff courses, remedy access issues, provide progreamming and support mechanisms for students from multiple disciplines while balancing ever shrinking resources also became amplified as Covid shut the world down and Black Studies strove to maintain spaces of intellectural haven for students and faculty alike. This interactive panel will discuss the challenges that leaders of Black campus communites faced before, during, and after the pandemic; demonstrate the ways they continue to address those challenges; and posit insights on strategiies for the future of Black Studies.

Maria Rice Bellamy
Assc Professor
College of Staten Island
Teresa A. Booker
Assc Professor
John Jay College
Natanya Duncan
Assc Professor
Queens College
Shelly Eversley
Professor
Baruch College
Jessica Gitt Gordon-Nembhard
Professor
John Jay College
Patricia Haggler
Lecturer Doc Sch
York College

Latinx for Whom? Reflections Upon Gender Neutrality in Shaping (Our) Latina/o Identities

Tracks: Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Individual Paper

This presentation will reflect on the recent incorporation of the term Latinx to illustrate the diversity of Latin American identities in the United States. Latinx has become an all-gender-inclusive label that embraces a rainbow of sexual/gender identities and, by the same token, calls attention to the injustices suffered by discriminated minorities, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people. The author will discuss the pros and cons of the term Latinx as replacement for others that represent Latinos/as in the U.S. Some detractors argue that the label Latinx, rather than being all inclusive, is gender erasing as it ignores the struggles of cis and transgender Latinas who have fought hard to be acknowledged within U.S. identity hierarchies. The presentation will end by offering concrete recommendations on how to use the term Latinx in research to properly reflect diverse Latino/a identities in the U.S. and overseas

Anahi Viladrich
Professor
Queens College

Reflections on Challenges Experienced by International Faculty at CUNY

Track: Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel Discussion

Once hired, the identity of international faculty gets recategorized within the conventional dimensions of the CUNY Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) policies. Consequentially, their immigration status and their migration narratives are rendered completely irrelevant and insignificant. In this panel discussion, three faculty members from Hunter, Laguardia and City Tech will share their reflections on how they have asserted this aspect of their identity within their departments, colleges, and CUNY. Their reflections will focus on 6 broad themes as follows: 1) visa and immigration issues, 2) Cultural and pedagogical differences and barriers, 3) Professional isolation and lack of support, 4) Limited career advancement opportunities, 5) Workload and expectations and 6) Family and personal challenges. This solution-focused panel discussion aims to increase awareness and understanding of the challenges faced by international faculty; develop and improve support and resources for international faculty and initiate efforts for a more inclusive and supportive campus climate.

Tao Chen
Professor
LaGuardia CC
Smita Ekka Dewan
Asst Professor
NYC College of Technology
Rong Zhao
Asst Professor
Hunter College

Translanguaging in Higher Education: Disrupting Normative Teaching Practices

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel/Workshop

In this panel, presenters will address translanguaging pedagogy in different settings in higher education. Translanguaging pedagogy includes the consideration of translingual and literary texts, writing, discussions, and multimodal student artifacts. The panel will begin with an overview of translanguaging theory, followed by panelists presenting on their specific area within their CUNY teaching. Participants will leave with a solid understanding of translanguaging pedagogy; practical tools, texts, and assignments; and vision for curriculum design in their respective programs

Laura Ascenzi-Moreno
Professor
Brooklyn College
Carla España
Asst Professor
Brooklyn College
Ivana Espinet
Faculty
Kingsborough Community College
Cecilia M. Espinosa
Professor
Lehman College
Khanh Le
Asst Professor
Queens College
Mike Mena
Assistant Professor
Brooklyn College

From Theory to Praxis: Using Antiracist Pedagogy to Foster Student Sense of Belonging

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Panel

Many college students of color do not feel a sense of belonging at their institution. Inclusive initiatives in higher education are often just words with no real actions developed to address the systems that perpetuate inequities or usher in change. Inclusive teaching practices frequently do not address underlying justice issues by proceeding from an equality perspective, that all students are equal regardless of their backgrounds or identities, as opposed to equity. Diversity efforts often give the semblance of inclusion without giving voice to those whose voices have been marginalized. The work of anti-racist pedagogy is action oriented. Effective training in the implementation of anti-racist pedagogical practices provides faculty and staff with the tools to help recognize and dismantle racism in all its forms. In this workshop participants will explore best practices and strategies for creating anti-racist pedagogy professional development workshops for faculty and staff to promote student belonging and equity.

Kirsten Cole
Assc Professor
Borough of Manhattan CC
Shawn Grant
Assistant Professor, Business Management
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Angela Polite
Lecturer
Borough of Manhattan CC

Lessons Learned in Implementing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Teacher Education

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies

Presentation

The experiences of CUNY educators at Lehman College and Brooklyn College will be showcased, specifically in implementing culturally responsive and sustaining pedagogies. This will demonstrate their commitment to creating a teaching environment and curriculum that are antiracist, culturally responsive, and culturally sustaining. The development and implementation of a teacher preparation curriculum in which the identities of students of color are valued and affirmed and which prepare all teacher candidates to ensure the academic success of P-12 students of color and how this would increase access to educational opportunities for students of color will reinforce pedagogical concepts. Such new models for teacher preparation programs may benefit the entire CUNY community. Lehman College faculty will offer an interactive session framed by their own classroom stories that reflect on the hits and miss, such as when a teacher has to juggle multiple angles of diversity, including graduate-undergraduate mixing, differences in academic levels, racial/cultural diversity, and socio-economic disparities. Brooklyn College faculty will feature their process of analysis and assessment that redesigned the undergraduate program in Childhood Education.

Rabab Abi-Hanna
Asst Professor
Lehman College
Laura Ascenzi-Moreno
Professor
Brooklyn College
April Whatley Bedford
Sr VP Acad Aff and Provost
Brooklyn College
Tiffany DeJaynes
Assc Professor
Lehman College
Amanda Gulla
Professor
Lehman College
Immaculee Harushimana
Professor
Lehman College
Hanna Haydar
Assc Professor
Brooklyn College
Meral Kaya
Brooklyn College
Tashika McBride
Lecturer
Lehman College
Amanda Moody
Substitute Lecturer, Middle and High School Department (TESOL)
Lehman College

Representation by Design:
Exploring Where Minority Populations Exist in Two Design Spaces, Architecture and Graphic Design Canon

Track: Designing Inclusive Pedagogies, Organizational Equity - Systems/People/Culture

Panel

This panel will explore the work of two CUNY scholars who are working to promote greater representation in their respective fields of design.  One of the speakers will take the audience through The Design Influencer Poster Project, a three-step process that aims to bridge the gap between context and creation so that students learn about those who created what influences them now—and remarkably, how many of those are overlooked or underrepresented in the cannon of graphic design. The goal of the project explores the traditional principles of design—composition, text, hierarchy, and the grid; however, it is the students’ research of unknown creators that drives the excitement of discovery. After researching the work of a designer overlooked by the canon, they present their findings to the class. The project culminates with designing a tribute poster to their subject. The second speaker is exploring the racial disparities in the architectural profession. Narrowing this disparity begins with providing affordable quality education. As an inner-city, minority-serving institution, City Tech is uniquely positioned to address this need and to contribute to increasing the diversity of the professional community. The presentations will each showcase different aspects of the Department of Architectural Technology at the New York College of Technology (City Tech) that together support pathways into the profession for students who may be disadvantaged by prior educational models.

Patricia Childers
New York City College of Technology
Ting Chin
Assc Professor
NYC College of Technology
Anita Francesca Maria Giraldo
Assc Professor
NYC College of Technology
Claudia Elena Hernandez Feiks
Assc Professor
NYC College of Technology
Jieun Yang
Asst Professor
NYC College of Technology